Thursday, October 2, 2014

Fourth Graders Use Maps to Discover the Gowanus forests and wetlands of 350 to 400 years ago...

Then they use chalk to draw and write in order to inform others about what they learned.
The map is really two in one...a 1766 map of Brooklyn with a modern day street grid superimposed.
Map was created and given to us by Eymund Diegel.
Students add slogans as well as drawings about what was covered over by concrete.



Students trace the path to pinpoint where they are and what was there in 1766.













1 comment:

  1. If you want to download a version of the 1766 Map you can download it from here:
    (sign into Issuu, and click on "share" button at bottom of page)

    http://issuu.com/proteusgowanus/docs/0_gowanus_history_map_1766

    This one has building footprints:
    http://issuu.com/proteusgowanus/docs/0_gowanus_history_map_1766_2014_upd


    And this one has the original 1766 Ratzer Map and overlays split on different pages:
    http://issuu.com/proteusgowanus/docs/0_how_the_gowanus_has_changed_since_1766

    You can read more about Gowanus History by exploring documents in the Hall of the Gowanus:

    http://issuu.com/proteusgowanus

    and the Gowanus CSI Project (Creek Scene Investigation) here:

    http://motherboard.vice.com/read/the-hunt-for-brooklyns-hidden-creeks

    You can find out about clues and tools for your CSI project here:
    http://publiclab.org/notes/liz/05-07-2014/gowanus-csi-creek-scene-investigation

    and using Public Lab tools stream hunting for having fun in your backyard:
    http://publiclab.org/notes/liz/09-30-2014/gowanus-all-day

    http://publiclab.org/notes/liz/10-01-2014/next-attempts-at-dye-tracing

    Happy stream hunting !

    Eymund

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